Accomodating policy

The duty to accommodate is most often applied in situations involving persons with physical or mental disability but it also applies to all other grounds covered by the Canadian Human Rights Act, for example: Please note: Different jurisdictions may have different interpretations about the duty to accommodate.

It is important to check with your provincial/territorial Human Rights Commission.

Although the law doesn't prohibit simple teasing, offhand comments, or isolated incidents that aren't very serious, harassment is illegal when it is so frequent or severe that it creates a hostile or offensive work environment or when it results in an adverse employment decision (such as the victim being fired or demoted).

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A disability can be either permanent (for example, a hearing or mobility impairment) or temporary (for example, a treatable illness or temporary impairment that is the result of an accident).

A disability can also be visible (for example, a wheelchair or white cane indicates the person has a disability) or invisible (for example, a mental illness).

Religious discrimination can also involve treating someone differently because that person is married to (or associated with) an individual of a particular religion.

The law forbids discrimination when it comes to any aspect of employment, including hiring, firing, pay, job assignments, promotions, layoff, training, fringe benefits, and any other term or condition of employment.

“Deposit” means any returnable key deposit that must be paid by the Occupier before taking possession of a Room and which will be returned to the Occupier on receipt of the Key and provided that the Room is left in a satisfactory condition.

Last modified 09-Aug-2016 08:13